Quartz

              

Quartz is the name given to extremely pure silicon dioxide (SIO2) crystals. Crystal Quartz stone, also known as Quartz Crystal, can be found in many areas across the globe. It is a solid and hard mineral that forms more than 10 % of the earth crust. Crystals are in the shape of hexagonal prisms.

Quartz crystal used for magic and treatment purposes since the ancient times is formed by oxygen and silicon. In the present day, it is used for treatment purposes. It is the symbol of power and strength in metaphysics. It relays the energy of nature.

Quartz is subjected to the following steps to be provided with its final form:

1. Raw Material Supply: The quartz is provided from any quartz quarry provided that it is clean. The provided quartz is crushed down to its finest particle. The crushed quartz is mixed with binder clay and granulated glass, water is added, the mixture is kneaded according to the consistency of solid dough, thereby preparing the dough for the quartz ceramic. The prepared clay has a quartz content of 85 %.

2. Cast Forming: The prepared dough is pressed into the wood or plaster molds to achieve the initial forming. These are dried for 15 days in a cool place not subject to breeze. The sizing, correction and smoothing processes are performed and the products are left to dry for another 15 days.

3. First Firing (Bisque Firing): The dried, formed and lined products are fired in the primary firing step at a temperature of 950 °C for 12 hours. The products with completed primary firing are called at this stage the substructure and they are ready for decorating, i.e. the pattern application.

4. Paint Preparation: The paints used are obtained from the metal oxides. These oxides are the following: Red – Iron Oxide Green - Chromium Oxide Turquoise - Copper Oxide Purple - Manganese Oxide Dark blue - Cobalt Oxide The oxides employed are mixed with clay and thus are turned into paint. This mixture is thoroughly crushed, filtered, then mixed with water and used as paint.

5. Glazing: This is the process of melting at elevated temperature the melting oxides and the glass phase formers to bind the same to one another in order to obtain the transparent glass. The glaze provides protection for the patterns and the surface by way of coating the patterns and surface.

6. Second Firing: Via this firing step carried out at 920 °C for 16 hours, the glaze melts over the body and takes the form of glass and enables the product to attain its final visual and physical state.

Known Benefits of Quartz Crystal:

• It eliminates the negative energy formed around a person, collects, activates and stores positive energy. Activates the mental energies.

• Supports the emotional balance. Stimulates the brain functions.

• Gives strength and protects vital functions.

• Collects the radiation emitted by devices particularly including mobile phones and wireless devices.

• Enhances the mental concentration.

• Creates a diminishing effect for headaches.

• Supports the health of digestive and circulatory systems.

• It is healthy for eyes.

Properties of Quartz Crystal and Areas of Use:

• It protects colours and the energy contained throughout centuries.

• Liquid or solid chemical spills do not cause deformation.

• It may be used on external walls and wet areas such as bathrooms, hamams (Turkish baths) and kitchens.

• It absorbs the radiation in the places it is installed or kept.

• It allows air circulation in the spaces and prevents moisture accumulation.

• It does not allow bacteria formation and it is very hygienic as it is a semi-precious stone.

The best quartz artist in the works lived in Iznik-Nicea (Turkey) between the 15th Century and the 17th Century and they built the best examples of the architectural structures such as Topkapi Palace, Istanbul (1478), Rustem Pasha Mosque, Istanbul (1563) and Blue Mosque, Istanbul (1616) using the quartz crystals. There are quartz tiles in the aforementioned structures. Tiles have patterns of our national flowers- tulips and cloves. In addition, there are patterns representing the tree of life, Seljuk patterns and geometrical patterns.

Stoneware

           

Stoneware products, named after their durability and strength resembling those of a stone or rock, are the solid and sanitary products with mechanical and thermal shock resistance, low porosity and non-water absorption, which are obtained by bringing together and firing at 1050 °C the environment-respectful and sanitary raw materials in a certain composition.

Stoneware is the general name for the products, which are obtained by way of blending the inorganic materials, shaping the same according to a certain form and firing at elevated temperatures. Quartz, feldspar, clay and kaolin substances are used in the stoneware slurry. The raw materials are mixed and milled in order to make the slurry. At this stage, the slurry is obtained.

1. Quartz: These contain various minerals having SIO2 composition and different crystal structures (polymorph). Silicon dioxide serves important functions in the ceramic slurries and glazes, thereby enjoying a wide field of application. (Maximum up to 30 %)

2. Feldspar: These are aluminum silicates with potassium, sodium, calcium and rarely barium content and they constitute the most important mineral group. They exhibit the ability to consolidate and melt the slurries when a certain firing temperature is reached. They are at the same time very important melters employed in the glazes. (Maximum up to 15 %)

3. Clay-Kaolin: Clay minerals contain fine-grained hydrated aluminum silicates and generally have a laminated structure observed in a wide range. Owing to their plasticity and dry strength, they are often used in the ceramics. (Maximum up to 55 %)

Colours: Pigment is a kind of paint raw material. It is comprised by water insoluble tiny particles employed for coloring purposes. It is classified into two groups, namely organic and inorganic pigments. The inorganic pigments, which are more resistant to the external factors, are within our area of interest.

Glaze: The glaze component is comprised by boron frit, kaolin, water and CMC. The frit mixture basically contains the quartz, kaolin, feldspar and boron. The glaze is obtained by way of milling the frit, water and kaolin. After the milling process, CMC is added and the glaze is made ready to use via the mixing process. The glaze, which has become ready for use, is lead-free and sanitary.

The stoneware slurry thus obtained is subjected to the following respective steps in order to provide the product with its final form:

1. Cast Forming: The forms are obtained by way of forming the stocked slurry in plaster molds. The slurry takes the shape of the plaster surface. The slurry thus formed is allowed to dry.

2. First Firing (Bisque Firing): The dried raw materials are filled into the kiln for the primary firing. At this stage, the products have rather low strength. The bisque firing is carried at 1000 °C for 12 hours. After the firing, the formed bodies (builds) acquire strength. Owing to such strength, they are not damaged during the decorating process.

3. Paint Preparation: The pigments provided in a ready to use state are mixed with the slurry and water according to certain proportions. The mixing process is performed in a double mill.

4. Drawing and Painting: The fired products are conveyed to the decorating unit for the decorating process. During the decorating process, the desired decor (pattern) and colors are applied to the product. The decorated products are left to stand for the glazing process.

5. Glazing: The glazing process is the process of coating the decorated product with a layer of glaze. The dipping method is employed for glazing the ceramic products. According to this method, the products are dipped for a certain period of time in a vessel filled with aqueous glaze.

6. Second Firing: This is the process of firing carried out in order to enable the glazed product to achieve its final form. By means of this firing process performed at 1050 °C for 16 hours, the glaze melts over the body to attain the vitrified status and said process enables the product to achieve its final form visually and physically.

 Terracotta 

        

The word terracotta means baked clay-based brownish red colored ceramic. It has an area of usage ranging from the flowerpots and pots to water pipes and surface decorations. In the past, it was commonly used in the making of decorative objects and statues. Since Quartz Ceramics is aware that the terracotta slurry is of lower quality, it designs the terracotta products using the earthenware slurry rather than the terracotta slurry, whereas the patterns on the products are the terracotta patterns.

Paint: They have the plastic paint in the background and the same paints are employed for the patterns. The patterns are drawn with fine-point terracotta pencils and painted.

1. Cast Forming: The forms are obtained by way of forming the stocked slurry in plaster molds. The slurry takes the shape of the plaster surface. The slurry thus formed is allowed to dry.

2. First Firing (Bisque Firing): The dried raw materials are filled into the kiln for the primary firing. At this stage, the products have rather low strength. The bisque firing is carried at 920 °C for 12 hours. After the firing, the formed bodies (builds) acquire strength. Owing to such strength, they are not damaged during the decorating process.

3. Glazing: After the primary firing process is completed, the interior zones of the product are glazed via the dipping method. As a result, the interior of the product becomes glazed.

4. Second Firing: This is the process of firing performed in order to provide the interior of the product with its final form once said interior is glazed. In this firing step, the product is fired at 915 °C for 16 hours.

5. Paint Preparation: Paints include the plastic paints provided in a ready to use state.

6. Drawing and Painting: The interior of the product has been glazed and the only remaining process for the fired products is the decorating process. The products are drawn with fine-point terracotta pencils and colored using the plastic paints.

7. Varnishing: Varnishing method is a method performed in order to provide the painted products with their final form. The surface of the products is varnished using the no. 2.5 brush and thus the product is enabled to attain its final form.

Terracotta products are glazed only on the interior surface and are thus sanitary. Their exterior surface is varnished and therefore the products may not be subjected to in the dishwashers. They can be cleaned by hand washing.

Earthenware

                   

This is a type of ceramic obtained from the earth in order to decorate the walls of buildings. Earthenware is a result of the combination of 3 different mixes. These blends and ratios are:

1. Quartz: These contain various minerals having SIO2 composition and different crystal structures (polymorph). Silicon dioxide serves important functions in the ceramic slurries and glazes, thereby enjoying a wide field of application. (Maximum up to 25 %)

2. Feldspar: These are aluminum silicates with potassium, sodium, calcium and rarely barium content and they constitute the most important mineral group. They exhibit the ability to consolidate and melt the slurries when a certain firing temperature is reached. They are at the same time very important melters employed in the glazes. (Maximum up to 15 %)

3. Clay - Kaolin: Clay minerals contain fine-grained hydrated aluminum silicates and generally have a laminated structure observed in a wide range. Owing to their plasticity and dry strength, they are often used in the ceramics. (Maximum up to 60 %)

Colours: Pigment is a kind of paint raw material. It is comprised by water insoluble tiny particles employed for coloring purposes. It is classified into two groups, namely organic and inorganic pigments. The inorganic pigments, which are more resistant to the external factors, are within our area of interest.

Glaze: The glaze component is comprised by boron frit, kaolin, water and CMC. The frit mixture basically contains the quartz, kaolin, feldspar and boron. The glaze is obtained by way of milling the frit, water and kaolin. After the milling process, CMC is added and the glaze is made ready to use via the mixing process. The glaze, which has become ready for use, is lead-free and sanitary.

The earthenware slurry thus obtained is subjected to the following respective steps in order to provide the product with its final form:

1. Cast Forming: The forms are obtained by way of forming the stocked slurry in plaster molds. The slurry takes the shape of the plaster surface. The slurry thus formed is allowed to dry.

2. First Firing (Bisque Firing): The dried raw materials are filled into the kiln for the primary firing. At this stage, the products have rather low strength. The bisque firing is carried at 920 °C for 12 hours. After the firing, the formed bodies (builds) acquire strength. Owing to such strength, they are not damaged during the decorating process.

3. Paint Preparation: The pigments provided in a ready to use state are mixed with the slurry and water according to certain proportions. The mixing process is performed in a double mill.

4. Drawing and Painting: The fired products are conveyed to the decorating unit for the decorating process. During the decorating process, the desired decor (pattern) and colors are applied to the product. The decorated products are left to stand for the glazing process.

5. Glazing: The glazing process is the process of coating the decorated product with a layer of glaze. The dipping method is employed for glazing the ceramic products. According to this method, the products are dipped for a certain period of time in a vessel filled with aqueous glaze.

6. Second Firing: This is the process of firing carried out in order to enable the glazed product to achieve its final form. By means of this firing process performed at 915 °C for 16 hours, the glaze melts over the body to attain the vitrified status and said process enables the product to achieve its final form visually and physically.